Ashish's Note

Over the past few years, I learnt a lot and get fond of Microsoft Technlogy. From The basics of Active Directory to the high end troubleshooting and disaster recovery, to the VPN configuration, Its being a good time for me as I got lots of opportunities to learn and grow.

In 2004, I got hired by "Microsoft" as a full time employee in its GTSC located in Bangalore. I experienced hardcore troubleshooting on real time issues as a big challange and very very intersting, which gave me vibrant knowledge of Operating System Troubleshooting, Active Directory, Clustering, Performance, Disks, Terminal Server, Printing, STOP Codes and BSOD screens.

My Fantastic past experience on HP/MSCS cluster, Server Hardware and System Administration, boosted my skills to take charge of customer's problem and make me to deal with the issues till the resolution.


Today working with Perot Systems, I am using this Blog to contribute my knowledge to the society and to make every individual who need directives to grow in IT field.

Lets post your views and questions you have, hit my brain to let it mentor the best possible IT solutions and career options.

Yours,

Ashish Sharma.

Wednesday, June 27, 2007

Letting a User Start and Stop Services Without Granting the User Administrator Privileges

Services have ACLs like other objects do, so you can grant services specific start and stop permissions. Unfortunately, the Microsoft Management Console (MMC) Services snap-in doesn't expose service ACLs in the interface, but two other methods for editing service permissions are available.

With the first method, you create a security template via the MMC Security Templates snap-in and navigate to the System Services folder. Open the Service Properties page, select the Define this property check box, and click Edit Security, which opens the ACL for the service. Grant the consultant Start, stop and pause permission. Save the policy, and apply it by using the MMC Configuration and Analysis snap-in.

The other method is more direct but it requires that you use the command line. Using the /service parameter with the Subinacl command lets you grant permissions to a service. For example, to grant Randy in domain Acme Start, stop and pause permission for the Spooler service, open a command line and type

subinacl /service spooler /grant=acme\randy=top

Note that you must specify the service name of the service, not its display name. You can get a list of all services with their display names and actual names by typing the command sc query

You can download Subinacl from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=23418. When you execute the subinacl.msi file, it installs the Subinacl command and a Help file in the %programfiles%\Windows Resource Kits\Tools folder.

1 comments:

Debasish said...

Can u explain me about generations in Garbage Collector.(with real time example)